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Wit idioms

Here is a list of idiomatic expressions using the word wit. At one’s wit’s end When you are at your wit’s end, you are at the limits of your intellectual resources. She didn’t know...

Abate | A word a day

Abate (verb) To abate something is to reduce its degree, severity or intensity. Present: abate / abates Past: abated Past participle: abated Gerund or –ing form: abating Example sentences Her sarcastic remarks didn’t abate...

Abash | A word a day

Abash (verb) Present: abash / abashed Past: abashed Past participle: abashed Gerund or –ing form: abashing To abash someone is to make them feel embarrassed or confused. Her remarks were harsh enough to abash...

Abase | A word a day

Abase (verb) Present: abase / abases Past simple: abased Past participle: abased Gerund or –ing form: abasing To abase yourself is to behave in a way that degrades or humiliates you. He doesn’t mind...

Idiomatic expressions with heels

Here is a list of idiomatic expressions using the word heels. At someone’s heels When you are at someone’s heels, you are just behind them. The mother pushed her way through the crowd, her...

Idioms about cats

Here is a list of idiomatic expressions using the word cat. Be the cat’s whiskers When you are the cat’s whiskers, you are better than anybody else. Ever since he asked her out on...

Tenses in subordinate clauses

Sometimes there is a difference between the time expressed in the main clause and the time expressed in the subordinate clause. This can cause a great deal of confusion for ESL students. Many of...

Even as, even though, even if and even so

The expressions even as, even so, even if and even though have very different meanings. Even as Even as means at the same time as. This expression is used to suggest that something is...