Common animal idioms

Posted by Manjusha. Filed in English speaking

Here is a list of some common animal idioms with their meanings and example sentences.

Act as a guinea pig

When you act as a guinea pig, you allow some kind of experiment to be performed on you.

Poor patients in undeveloped countries often act as guinea pigs for clinical trials.

Ahead of the pack

When you are ahead of the pack you are more successful than your peers.

You can't compare Raju with other boys in the class. He is way ahead of the pack.

Alley cat

An alley cat is a stray cat.

The girl took a liking to the stray cat and brought it home but her mother did not like it.

As awkward as a cow on roller skates

When you are as awkward as a cow on roller skates, you feel very awkward.

I was awkward as a cow on roller skates when I went to a night club for the first time.

As blind as a bat

When you are as blind as a bat, you are totally blind.

As busy as a beaver

When you are as busy as a beaver, you are very busy.

As gruff as a bear

When you are as gruff as a bear, you are very unsociable.

animal idioms

My neighbour is as a gruff a bear. He hates to interact with us.

As hungry as a bear

When you are as hungry as a bear, you are very hungry.

I hadn't eaten anything the whole day so I was as hungry as a bear when I reached home.

As scared as a rabbit

When you are as scared as a rabbit, you are very scared.

The little girl looked as scared as a rabbit.

As sick as a dog

When you are as sick as a dog, you are very sick.

He was as sick as a dog when he reached home.

As sly as a fox

This expression is used to refer to a person who is very smart and clever.

The old man is as sly as a fox. You must be careful when you deal with him.

As stubborn as a mule

This expression is used to refer to a person who is very stubborn.

My younger sister is as a stubborn as a mule. She will never change her mind no matter what happens.

Back the wrong horse

To back the wrong horse is to support someone who does not have any chance to win.

I am afraid you are backing the wrong horse.

Bark up the wrong tree

To bark up the wrong tree is to put the blame on the wrong person.

You are barking up the wrong tree. I didn't break the vase.

Beat a dead horse

To beat a dead horse is to try to revive interest in a hopeless issue.

Share |

More phrasal verbs exercises

Phrasal verbs worksheet 1
Phrasal verbs worksheet 2
Phrasal verbs worksheet 3
Phrasal verbs worksheet 4 | Phrasal verbs with break
Phrasal verbs worksheet 5 | Phrasal verbs with bring

English speaking - Lessons

Phrasal verbs