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Phrasal verbs with hold

Hold is used in a large number of common idiomatic phrasal verbs. Here is a list of them.

What is a phrasal verb?

A phrasal verb is a two-word verb whose meaning is sometimes very different from the meanings of the two-words taken separately.

Phrasal verbs with hold

Hold off

To hold off is to delay something.

  • We had to hold off buying a new apartment because we were short of money.

Hold off can also mean ‘keep at a distance’.

  • The police used tear gas shells to hold off the mob.
Hold on

Hold on can mean ‘wait’. It can also mean ‘grip tightly’.

  • Hold on a minute. I will be back in a second.
  • Get a good hold on the rope before you try to climb.
Hold onto

To hold onto something is to hold it tightly.

  • Hold onto to the rope. I’m going to pull you up.

Hold onto can also mean ‘keep something longer than necessary’.

  • She likes to hold onto old newspapers and magazines.
Hold out

To hold out is to keep one’s position or strength.

  • He held out until he got what he wanted. (= He kept his position until he got what he wanted.)

To hold out your arms is to extend them in front of you.

  • The magician asked them to hold out their arms.
Hold out for

To hold out for is to wait for something better.

Hold out on

To hold out on somebody is to hide something from them.

  • You can’t hold out on me. Tell me what you were doing there.
Hold over

To hold something over is to postpone it.

  • The meeting was held over because the chairperson was ill.

Hold over can also mean ‘go longer than planned’.

  • The suspense was held over until she returned home from work.
Hold up

To hold something up is to delay it. To hold somebody up is to stop them by force for the purpose of robbery.

  • We were held up by a huge traffic jam.
  • The shop was held up by gunmen wearing masks.
Hold with = approve of

I don’t hold with your opinion that all politicians are corrupt.

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Phrasal verbs

 

 

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