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American and British English: Differences in Grammar

Posted by Manjusha Filed in English Writing

These two varieties of English are very similar that most American and British speakers can understand each other without great difficulty. There are, however, a few differences of grammar, vocabulary and spelling. The following guide is meant to point out the principal differences between American English (AE) and British English (BE).

Differences in Grammar

Use of the Present Perfect

The British use the present perfect to talk about a past action which has an effect on the present moment. In American English both simple past and present perfect are possible in such situations.

  • I have lost my pen. Can you lend me yours? (BE)
  • I lost my pen. OR I have lost my pen. (AE)
  • He has gone home. (BE)
  • He went home. OR He has gone home. (AE)

Other differences include the use of already, just and yet. The British use the present perfect with these adverbs of indefinite time. In American English simple past and present perfect are both possible.

  • He has just gone home. (BE)
  • He just went home. OR He has just gone home. (AE)
  • I have already seen this movie. (BE)
  • I have already seen this movie. OR I already saw this movie. (AE)
  • She hasn't come yet. (BE)
  • She hasn't come yet. OR She didn't come yet. (AE)
Possession

The British normally use have got to show possession. In American English have (in the structure do you have) and have got are both possible.

  • Have you got a car? (BE)
  • Do you have a car? OR Have you got a car? (AE)
Use of the verb Get

In British English the past participle of get is got. In American English the past participle of get is gotten, except when have got means have.

  • He has got a prize. (BE)
  • He has gotten a prize. (AE)
  • I have got two sisters. (BE)
  • I have got two sisters. (=I have two sisters.)(AE)
Will/Shall

In British English it is fairly common to use shall with the first person to talk about the future. Americans rarely use shall.

  • I shall/will never forget this favour. (BE)
  • I will never forget this favour. (AE)

In offers the British use shall. Americans use should.

  • Shall I help you with the homework? (BE)
  • Should I help you with the homework? (AE)
Need

In British English needn't and don't need to are both possible. Americans normally use don't need to.

  • You needn't reserve seats. OR You don't need to reserve seats. (BE)
  • You don't need to reserve seats. (AE)

Sections in this article

American and British English: differences in grammar - I
American and British English: differences in grammar - II
American and British English: differences in vocabulary - I
American and British English: differences in vocabulary - II
American and British English: differences in usage - I
American and British English: differences in usage - II
American and British English: differences in spelling

 

 

 

 

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