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11 Substitutes for because and because of

Posted by Manjusha. Filed in English Grammar

In English we use many different words and phrases to give the reason for something. Of course, the most common is ‘because’. Other words/phrases are not so common.

Because is a conjunction. It should be followed by a clause. The phrase ‘because of’ is also used to give an explanation. It is a two-word preposition and should be followed by a noun, not a clause.

  • The flight was cancelled because the weather was bad. (Here the conjunction because is followed by the clause ‘the weather was bad’.)
  • The flight was cancelled because of bad weather. (Here the preposition ‘because of’ is followed by the noun ‘bad weather’.)

In this lesson, we will take a look at some not-so-common substitutes for because and because of.

1. As and since

These conjunctions are used when the reason is already known to the reader or when it is not the most important part of the sentence. As and since-clauses usually come at the beginning of the sentence.

  • As he was late, we went without him. OR Since he was late, we went without him.
  • Since he has paid the dues, we will not cancel his subscription.

Because is used when the reason is not known to the reader/listener or when the writer wants to put emphasis on the reason.

  • We cancelled the trip because we didn’t have enough money to buy tickets. (Here the emphasis is on the reason.)
  • As / since we didn’t have enough money to buy tickets, we cancelled the trip. (Here the emphasis is on the result.)

2. As a result of

As a result of is a substitute for ‘because of’. It should be followed by a preposition.

  • As a result of his timely intervention, the problem was solved amicably.
  • As a result of the injury, he couldn’t play for weeks.
  • Because of his timely intervention, the problem was solved amicably.
  • Because of the injury, he couldn’t play for weeks.

3. As long as

As long as can mean ‘since’ or ‘because’.

  • As long as you are going to the supermarket, please buy some vegetables and eggs. (= Because you are going to the supermarket,…)

So long as can also be used.

  • So long as you are here, please take care of the babies. (Since you are here, please take care of the babies.)

As long as can also be used to state conditions.

  • As long as she behaves responsibly, she will not land in trouble.
  • OR She will not land in trouble on condition that she behaves responsibly.

Note that after as long as, we use a present tense to refer to the future.

4. Due to

‘Due to’ is a preposition. It can be used instead of because of.

  • Due to poor management, the company suffered huge financial loss.
  • He almost died due to lack of oxygen.

Note that because of can also be used in this case.

  • Because of poor management, the company suffered huge financial loss.

5. For

For can be a substitute for because in a poetic style.

  • Let us make merry, for tomorrow we may die.

6. Inasmuch as

Inasmuch as has more or less the same meaning as ‘because’. It is mainly used in a formal style.

  • Inasmuch as you are their guardian, you are responsible for their behavior. (= Because you are their guardian, you are responsible for their behavior.)
  • Inasmuch as she is the only earning member of the family, she has a duty to support her parents and siblings.

7. In view of the fact that

This phrase has the same meaning as inasmuch as.

  • In view of the fact that she is the most deserving candidate, we have decided to appoint her.
  • OR Because she is the most deserving candidate, we have decided to appoint her.

8. Now that

Now that can be used as a conjunction. In an informal style, that is often dropped.

  • Now that you are married, you ought to be more responsible. (OR You ought to be more responsible now because you are married.)

9. Out of

This phrase is used to give explanations of emotions or feelings.

  • I helped him out of compassion.

10. Owing to

Owing to is similar to due to. It is also used in a formal style.

  • Owing to his irresponsible behaviour, he lost his job. OR He lost the job because of his irresponsible behaviour.
  • Owing to his bad temper, his wife deserted him.

11. Thanks to

Thanks to is the equivalent of because of. This can refer to either a positive or negative outcome.

  • Thanks to his carelessness, we lost the money.
  • Thanks to the treatment, her condition has improved.

See also

  • How to use adverbs effectively
  • Joining two sentences into a single compound sentence
  • Common mistakes in the use of the simple present and present continuous tenses
  • When to use past perfect tense?
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