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English Grammar

Synthesis of sentences

Synthesis means the combination of two or more simple sentences into one new sentence – simple, compound or complex.

Ways of combining two or more simple sentences into one simple sentence.

By using a participle

This is possible only when the sentences have a common subject.

  • I read the book. I returned it to the library.
  • Having read the book I returned it to the library.
  • The farmer jumped on his horse. He rode to the market.
  • Jumping on his horse the farmer rode to the market.
  • He opened the gate. He took the dog out for a run.
  • Opening the gate he took the dog out for a run.
  • Henry planted a rose. He watered it. He manured it. He was delighted to see it beginning to flower.
  • Having planted a rose, and watered and manured it, Henry was delighted to see it beginning to flower.

By using the absolute construction

This is done when the sentences have different subjects.

Read the sentences given below.

The dog bit the post man. The farmer decided to shoot it.

These two sentences can be combined into one by using the absolute construction.

The dog having bitten the post man, the farmer decided to shoot it.
(‘Having bitten the postman, the farmer decided to shoot the dog’ is wrong. Because it would mean that it was the farmer who bit the postman and not the dog. )

  • It was a rainy day. We had to cancel the match.
  • It being a rainy day, we had to cancel the match. (NOT Being a rainy day we had to cancel the match.)
  • It was a small cot. He could not sleep on it.
  • It being a small cot, he could not sleep on it.
  • The president took his seat on the dais. The meeting began.
  • The president having taken his seat on the dais, the meeting began.
  • The storm subsided. We began our march again.
  • The storm having subsided, we began our march again.
  • The monsoon started. The village roads became muddy.
  • The monsoon having started, the village roads became muddy.
  • The examination was over. The college was closed. The students left for their homes. The campus looked deserted.
  • The examination being over, the college being closed and the students having left for their homes, the campus looked deserted.

Sections In This Article
Synthesis of sentences - I
Synthesis of sentences - II
Synthesis of sentences - III
Synthesis of sentences - IV

See Also
Adverb clauses
Adjective clauses
Noun clauses
Transformation of sentences

 

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